Myrtle wilson as the wasteland figure

History has taught us that peace must be kept at all costs. At the end of World War 1, the common goal between the victorious nations throughout the world was to declare peace.

Myrtle wilson as the wasteland figure

The Great Gatsby:

Though an intelligent child, he did poorly in school and was sent to a New Jersey boarding school in Despite being a mediocre student there, he managed to enroll at Princeton in Academic troubles and apathy plagued him throughout his time at college, and he never graduated, instead enlisting in the army inas World War I neared its end.

Fitzgerald became a second lieutenant, and was stationed at Camp Sheridan, in Montgomery, Alabama. There he met and fell in love with a wild seventeen-year-old beauty named Zelda Sayre.

Zelda finally agreed to marry him, but her overpowering desire for wealth, fun, and leisure led her to delay their wedding until he could prove a success. Also similar to Fitzgerald is Jay Gatsby, a sensitive young man who idolizes wealth and luxury and who falls in love with a beautiful young woman while stationed at a military camp in the South.

Having become a celebrity, Fitzgerald fell into a wild, reckless life-style of parties and decadence, while desperately trying to please Zelda by writing to earn money.

As the giddiness of the Roaring Twenties dissolved into the bleakness of the Great Depression, however, Zelda suffered a nervous breakdown and Fitzgerald battled alcoholism, which hampered his writing.

Prohibition, the ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol mandated by the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitutionmade millionaires out of bootleggers, and an underground culture of revelry sprang up. The chaos and violence of World War I left America in a state of shock, and the generation that fought the war turned to wild and extravagant living to compensate.

The staid conservatism and timeworn values of the previous decade were turned on their ear, as money, opulence, and exuberance became the order of the day. Now he found himself in an era in which unrestrained materialism set the tone of society, particularly in the large cities of the East.

Even so, like Nick, Fitzgerald saw through the glitter of the Jazz Age to the moral emptiness and hypocrisy beneath, and part of him longed for this absent moral center.

Myrtle wilson as the wasteland figure

Like Gatsby, Fitzgerald was driven by his love for a woman who symbolized everything he wanted, even as she led him toward everything he despised. Plot Overview Nick Carraway, a young man from Minnesota, moves to New York in the summer of to learn about the bond business.

He rents a house in the West Egg district of Long Island, a wealthy but unfashionable area populated by the new rich, a group who have made their fortunes too recently to have established social connections and who are prone to garish displays of wealth. Nick is unlike the other inhabitants of West Egg—he was educated at Yale and has social connections in East Egg, a fashionable area of Long Island home to the established upper class.

Daisy and Tom introduce Nick to Jordan Baker, a beautiful, cynical young woman with whom Nick begins a romantic relationship. Jordan tells him that Tom has a lover, Myrtle Wilson, who lives in the valley of ashes, a gray industrial dumping ground between West Egg and New York City.

At a vulgar, gaudy party in the apartment that Tom keeps for the affair, Myrtle begins to taunt Tom about Daisy, and Tom responds by breaking her nose. Gatsby tells Jordan that he knew Daisy in Louisville in and is deeply in love with her.

He spends many nights staring at the green light at the end of her dock, across the bay from his mansion.

Myrtle wilson as the wasteland figure

Gatsby now wants Nick to arrange a reunion between himself and Daisy, but he is afraid that Daisy will refuse to see him if she knows that he still loves her. Nick invites Daisy to have tea at his house, without telling her that Gatsby will also be there. After an initially awkward reunion, Gatsby and Daisy reestablish their connection.

Their love rekindled, they begin an affair. Though Tom is himself involved in an extramarital affair, he is deeply outraged by the thought that his wife could be unfaithful to him. Tom asserts that he and Daisy have a history that Gatsby could never understand, and he announces to his wife that Gatsby is a criminal—his fortune comes from bootlegging alcohol and other illegal activities.

Daisy realizes that her allegiance is to Tom, and Tom contemptuously sends her back to East Egg with Gatsby, attempting to prove that Gatsby cannot hurt him. They rush back to Long Island, where Nick learns from Gatsby that Daisy was driving the car when it struck Myrtle, but that Gatsby intends to take the blame.

George, who has leapt to the conclusion that the driver of the car that killed Myrtle must have been her lover, finds Gatsby in the pool at his mansion and shoots him dead. He then fatally shoots himself. However, he achieved this lofty goal by participating in organized crime, including distributing illegal alcohol and trading in stolen securities.

Blog Archive

From his early youth, Gatsby despised poverty and longed for wealth and sophistication—he dropped out of St. Though Gatsby has always wanted to be rich, his main motivation in acquiring his fortune was his love for Daisy Buchanan, whom he met as a young military officer in Louisville before leaving to fight in World War I in Daisy promised to wait for him when he left for the war, but married Tom Buchanan inwhile Gatsby was studying at Oxford after the war in an attempt to gain an education.Start studying English 11 Unit 4 The Great Gatsby test.

Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. the desolate wasteland where the Wilson's live. In the 's money was very abundant.

This was known as what age? Who was driving the car that killed Myrtle Wilson? Daisy Buchanan. Essay on Myrtle Wilson as the Wasteland Figure in the Great Gatsby November Myrtle and Fitzgerald's Wasteland Myrtle Wilson is Fitzgerald's vessel for illustrating the modern wasteland.

Myrtle Wilson - Tom’s lover, whose lifeless husband George owns a run-down garage in the valley of ashes. Myrtle herself possesses a fierce vitality and desperately looks for a way to improve her situation.

Popular Posts

Kathleen Parkinson places this brilliant and bitter satire on the moral failure of the Jazz Age firmly in the context of Scott Fitzgerald's life and times. She explores the intricate patterns of the novel, its chronology, locations, imagery and use of colour, and how these contribute to a seamless interplay of social comedy and symbolic landscape.

Myrtle Wilson is the mistress of Tom Buchanan and wife of George Wilson, men representing distinctly separate classes on the social spectrum.

Myrtle clearly aspires to a life of wealth with Tom, who humors her with gifts: a puppy, clothes, and various personal items. the “vast wasteland” of American television famously described by Newton Minow more than 40 years ago. Minow was an attorney appointed by President John F.

Kennedy as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.

Devil in the White City Essays